Another journey ’round the Kingston Zodiac

   
 
This month’s journey through the Kingston Zodiac, taken from the deepest recesses of my Merlinhedd YouTube channel archive, takes us through the Kingstonian Star Temple’s Libran Effigy. Libra’s ruling planet, like the preceding sign of Taurus, is the planet Venus, which co-rules the Second and Seventh Houses simultaneously.
 
As a quick view of the embedded video clip from Mary caine and Jonathan Barnett’s filmographic quest around the Kingston Zodiac will show, in former times the town of Kingston was the site of royal coronations which were symbolic, just as they still are, of the sacred bond of trust between a ruler and his and her people. Given the current melt down in the nation’s finances, it is perhaps significant that Taurus’s rulership of the Second House is connected with the House of Money. And it is perhaps as a result of a betrayal of some sacred trust that Mr. Brown is involved in the situation he is currently in.  
 
Viewers of this short clip will perhaps note a certain definite resemblance between this, the King’s Stone, and the ancient Stone of Scone in Scotland: the original coronation stone of the Kings of Scots who were originally elected from amongst a whole variety of prospective royal candidates: the last of whom was the unfortunate King Macbeth. Unbeknown to most browsers of this blog, Macbeth, contrary to what Shakespeare would have us believe, was the justly elected successor to a cruel tyrant who he had deposed for the benefit of the people. And, it is in commemoration of this once electoral institution that many of our traditional folk customs are still enacted across the land.   
 
Given the fact that in many countries the symbol of royalty is not the lion, as it has been in England since Mediaeval times at least, it is perhaps significant that Kingston’s royal Libran effigy is not a set of Scales, as one would expect, but a bird. A vital clue as to the possible identity of this royal bird can be found in the lyrics of the ancient Welsh folk song ‘Hela’r Dryw’ or ‘Hunting the Wren’; which, in certain parts of the Welsh countryside would be hunted and killed every St. Stephen’s Day (26th December) as part of the annual ritual death and rebirth of the Solar Year. This ritual killing would likewise involve an elaborate ritual procession complete with communal folk singing at which a number of different variants of the song, which have likewise turned up in Brittany, Man, Ireland and Cornwall, would be sung in the procession by those taking part. The fact that the wren is often referred to as ‘The King of Birds’ is perhaps indicative of it having been used as an ornithological substitute for its now hereditary human counterpart; now that the institution of monarchy has since moved away from its original electoral roots.     
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About tartantombraider

A lineal descendant of Captain Robert Ferguson (1719-1799) the older brother of the great Scottish Enlightenment Philosopher and historian Adam Ferguson (1723-1816); the friend of Hume, Gibbon and Adam Smith. Also related to the great feminist author and playwright Rachel Ferguson. Have written extensively on a vast range of subjects, published in print as book author and in various journals and magazines into the bargain. Early work as an underground film maker on the early Goa Trance and radical anti-CJB political scene in the 1990s has since become more refined and ambitious and I am now a regular contributor to such high profile events as the Portobello Film Festival Annual Film Maker's Convention.....:
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